Message Boards

Topic : 06/21 Little Boys, Big Weight Problems

Number of Replies: 370
New Messages This Week: 0
Last Reply On:
Created on : Friday, February 02, 2007, 03:08:27 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1
(Original Air Date: 02/07/07) More than half a billion adults are overweight worldwide, but even more shocking is that millions of children are already on the road to obesity. Amy’s son, Harrison, is only 7 years old, but already weighs 152 pounds. She says her husband, Tim, has no problem with their son’s size. He feeds the boy cookies, chips and ice cream, and even sneaks sugary snacks into his room at night. Amy fears that they’re killing their son with food. Is Tim the only one to blame for Harrison’s weight problem? World-renowned pediatrician Dr. Jim Sears shares his thoughts. Then, Carla wrote to Dr. Phil because her 4-year-old grandson, Logan, is already 30 pounds overweight. She says he has terrible eating habits and even breaks into the cupboard to sneak junk food. Carla wants to help him but says she can’t discuss the problem with her daughter, Jennifer, without an argument. Can Carla and Jennifer stop fighting long enough to start Logan on the path to weight loss? Plus, when Josh was on the show four years ago, he was 4 years old, 155 pounds and could barely walk. Dr. Phil worried that the little boy wouldn’t live to see another year. Is Josh still in jeopardy? Talk about the show here.

Find out what happened on the show.

More June 2007 Show Boards.

As of January, 2009, this message board will become "Read Only" and will be closed to further posting. Please join the NEW Dr. Phil Community to continue your discussions, personalize your message board experience, start a blog and meet new friends.

February 14, 2007, 1:58 pm CST

lazy and dont take the blame

i remember as a kid that everyone would play outside in the street, ride bikes, play at the playground, swim, etc etc...when your mom called you into dinner it was the last thing you wanted to hear...youd always yell( 5 more min) or something, then youd scarf down a little bit of dinner just to go outside and play again or do something else than sit at the dinner table...todays generation has sure changed.....when i was young fat was scarce...i mean people were not super skinny or anything but the majority of the population was pretty average...not many fat kids in my classes......so when i hear all these parents blaming it on medical problems blah blah...yes for one that is a possibility....but i dont think its the majority or nearly as common as it "seems" to be........face it....youre a bad parent who needs to grow up...just cuz youre kid cries and whines for food doesnt mean you need to give it to them......i mean my friend is 28 and has 3 young kids.....ill stop by the house and be eating some taco bell or something and they will have their own food at the table...they will say " mom i want taco bell, i want french fries" blah blah...thats what kids do right...they always want what they dont have..that even goes for toys etc.....

 

ive never posted before but i just hate seeing all these fat kids and adults not taking any blame for their actions......well anyways everyone...have a great day!!!!!!!!!

 
February 14, 2007, 4:00 pm CST

Why do Health Care Providers ride the children that are underweight

Quote From: vjonesrn63

I am a health care provider and have taken care of kids for over 12 years. I think that it's appalling for parents to allow children to become so unhealthy. I have a nephew that is 6 years old and he weighs more than a 125lbs. I blame his obesity on his mother  my sister). She doesn't prepare healthy meals and allows him to drink sodas like water. I have explained to her  the importance of weight loss for him because she describes to me what appears to be sleep apnea. As a health care provider I believe that these kids should be taken from those parents who absolutely don't care or get it. These kids could be placed in an environment that would be conducive to weight loss therefore improving and in most cases reversing the damage that has already  been done. This only one health care providers opinion. Does anyone  else have any suggestions on how the parents should get a grip?

 

 

I have 3 children, my almost 11 y.o. step-son is my oldest and he is a head and a half shorter than his classmates and weighs 65 lbs., he is a picky eater but he eats.  My 5 year old son just hit 33 lbs. and he is the smallest in his preschool, he isn't a picky eater and eats almost anything, yes including sweets.  My 19 month old daughter is only 22 lbs. and in the 5% on the charts yet is in the 75%height, she also eats 3 meals, usually 3 snacks, and still nurses regularly 3 times a day with an occasional extra 1 or 2 times.  The doc. at her last check up got on to us and said fed her more and don't give her water or juice give her milk.  He said we'd stunt her growth if we didn't.  At the time we rarely gave her juice, we did give her water and agains she was nursing even more than now.  She's only gained two pounds in 6 months yet she's grown, I get really frustrated over seeing all the overweight kids and yet ours are small and eat AND are active.  The docs need to STOP sending mixed messages.  We set the timer for video games and limit TV time to one movie or an hour and a half.  Although I will admit when my 5 year old discovered PBS Cartoons I was never more happy, he will sit still through them.  I even send my kids outside when it's not raining or to cold or in our case mostly to hot.  These poor overweight kids' parents need to wake up and take control.  We are not our kids's friends we are their parents!!  But the doctors need to take the reins also and encourage healthful living and all.

Jen

 
February 14, 2007, 4:17 pm CST

02/07 Little Boys, Big Weight Problems

Quote From: idamag

If you are out eating at the fast food places two or three times a week, that is too much.

 

There are three very important inventions that can help these families. It will be cheaper for them. the three inventions are: Stove, a pot to cook in, and a cookbook.

 

I think these women never learned to cook.

 

I used to work at a place that served special needs children. Quite often, one mother brought in her son a little late and told us he never had time for breakfast and left us with a bag of chips or cheetos to feed the child.

 

I think anyone getting food stamps should be required to take cooking classes provided by the state. For many poor people pay day means eating out at a fast food place and pizzas until the money runs out. I worked for Health and Welfare, I know.

i agree, a healthy living class perhaps., that includes recipes, cooking, and shopping, label reading, etc. This should also be a part of parenting classes
 
February 14, 2007, 11:36 pm CST

Terrible

This all boils down to one simple fact - humans don't emerge from the womb knowing what a cupcake or a chicken nugget is.  These stories profile child neglect if not outright child abuse.

 

I'd say more, but for some reason networks in one of the largest markets in the country have decided to show Phil one week late.  It's Valentine's day and I'm just seeing this episode today.

 
February 15, 2007, 6:34 am CST

underwt/overwt

Quote From: jedi500

I have 3 children, my almost 11 y.o. step-son is my oldest and he is a head and a half shorter than his classmates and weighs 65 lbs., he is a picky eater but he eats.  My 5 year old son just hit 33 lbs. and he is the smallest in his preschool, he isn't a picky eater and eats almost anything, yes including sweets.  My 19 month old daughter is only 22 lbs. and in the 5% on the charts yet is in the 75%height, she also eats 3 meals, usually 3 snacks, and still nurses regularly 3 times a day with an occasional extra 1 or 2 times.  The doc. at her last check up got on to us and said fed her more and don't give her water or juice give her milk.  He said we'd stunt her growth if we didn't.  At the time we rarely gave her juice, we did give her water and agains she was nursing even more than now.  She's only gained two pounds in 6 months yet she's grown, I get really frustrated over seeing all the overweight kids and yet ours are small and eat AND are active.  The docs need to STOP sending mixed messages.  We set the timer for video games and limit TV time to one movie or an hour and a half.  Although I will admit when my 5 year old discovered PBS Cartoons I was never more happy, he will sit still through them.  I even send my kids outside when it's not raining or to cold or in our case mostly to hot.  These poor overweight kids' parents need to wake up and take control.  We are not our kids's friends we are their parents!!  But the doctors need to take the reins also and encourage healthful living and all.

Jen

It's all about BALANCE.  It's like a seesaw or a caloric bank account.  My aunt is super-controlling about what her kids eat-almost NO meat, NO milk, and vegetables ALL the time.  They have SO many activities compacted into their day that they barely have time to breathe.  They are smaller than normal, tired all the time, and have poor concentration.  This to me is as much child abuse as allowing them access to sodas and junk food all the time.  Worse yet, they have a genetically acquired anemia, so they NEED protein to make blood cells and boost their immunity, which they seldom get.  Every situation is different- every kid is different.

 

Of course the doctor's NOT going to tell you that your kids need to hit the gym-they're already tiny.  Should the charts be reconfigured so that your kids are in the 50th percentile?  No.  A 19 month old should be off the breast- try goat's milk or cow's milk.  She needs solid foods also, that will help put on wt.  Offer more meat, more milk and more all around- they should NOT be on a low calorie diet- babies need fats for their brains to develop.  Please, Please feed them more-and this comes from a health care worker.

 
February 15, 2007, 9:59 am CST

skinny kids

Quote From: gwarrior6

It's all about BALANCE.  It's like a seesaw or a caloric bank account.  My aunt is super-controlling about what her kids eat-almost NO meat, NO milk, and vegetables ALL the time.  They have SO many activities compacted into their day that they barely have time to breathe.  They are smaller than normal, tired all the time, and have poor concentration.  This to me is as much child abuse as allowing them access to sodas and junk food all the time.  Worse yet, they have a genetically acquired anemia, so they NEED protein to make blood cells and boost their immunity, which they seldom get.  Every situation is different- every kid is different.

 

Of course the doctor's NOT going to tell you that your kids need to hit the gym-they're already tiny.  Should the charts be reconfigured so that your kids are in the 50th percentile?  No.  A 19 month old should be off the breast- try goat's milk or cow's milk.  She needs solid foods also, that will help put on wt.  Offer more meat, more milk and more all around- they should NOT be on a low calorie diet- babies need fats for their brains to develop.  Please, Please feed them more-and this comes from a health care worker.

My three boys are thin by genetics.  My boys are 18, 13, and 8.  My 13 year old went from kindergarten to third grade wearing the same size clothes.  He hardly grew or gained weight through those years.  He was an extremely picky eater.  We continued to give him healthy choices, and now that he is 13, he has grown 5 inches since the beginning of the school year, and he has gained 15 pounds, and he is a bottomless pit when it comes to eating.  He is still slim, and we continue to have healthy food choices for all of our kids.

 

Our 18 year old was always the smallest in his class, until he hit 10th grade.  He suddenly had a growth spurt, and now he is over 6 ft. tall, and weighs an appropriate 150 pounds.  He is appropriately slim and trim.

 

My 8 year old is still the picky eater, but he is growing and gaining weight, so we're not worried about the picky appetite.  He loves his meat and veggies.  We make sure that he gets a snack after school, and in the evening before bed...he seems to like to eat small amounts at a time.

 

I think the key to getting a child to eat enough is to offer healthy snacks and meals, and letting the kids help prepare their own food, tasting the ingredients when appropriate.  I know it has helped with our kids' picky appetites.

 

By the way, my youngest child breast fed until age 2 1/2...along with solids.  My other two naturally weaned themselves, but my youngest liked to cuddle and nurse...by age 2, the breast feeding was reserved for evening before bed...he didn't like being weaned, and he started biting me for awhile.  I wouldn't change a thing.  He is a very sweet and loving 8 year old now...still loves to hug and sit close for a bedtime story.  I think the breast feeding is an individual issue, as long as the child is getting plenty of solid foods too.

 

The purpose of the growth chart is to keep track of a child's individual growth.  If a child is in the 25th percentile for height, he should also be near the 25th percentile for weight.  If the percentages differ greatly, then there may be a weight issue...either underweight or overweight.  This is where the doctor will give advice or do testing to rule out health issues that may be causing the descrepancy.  Being small doesn't hurt the child, as long as the weight is proportionate to the height.  Sometimes it helps to look into the parent's growth patterns...I was always the smallest child in my class, so it makes sense that my kids would be too.

 

Do what works for your child, and take the doctor's advice with a grain of salt...they are not with you on a daily basis...they are there to monitor progress, monitor health, and give advice that seems appropriate at the time.  Keep the foods healthy, and your child will grow up just fine.

 
February 15, 2007, 10:04 am CST

cooking classes

Quote From: faeryedark

i agree, a healthy living class perhaps., that includes recipes, cooking, and shopping, label reading, etc. This should also be a part of parenting classes
I agree.  A healthy dose of child nutrition for the parents should be a part of parenting classes...if the parents would just go.  I think that a lot of the fast food problem is laziness.  My family would feel slighted without good homecooked meals.  The "I've Never Cooked Before" cookbook might be a good start...it has basic cooking instructions and a chapter on family nutrition.  The "Family Fun" magazine has a lot of good suggestions on how to make healthy meals fun.  Parents have a responsibility to seek out information on healthy eating for their children...and for themselves.  Kids with overweight parents are at higher risk for obesity.
 
February 15, 2007, 10:58 am CST

Not about genetics

Quote From: mustbecrazy

My three boys are thin by genetics.  My boys are 18, 13, and 8.  My 13 year old went from kindergarten to third grade wearing the same size clothes.  He hardly grew or gained weight through those years.  He was an extremely picky eater.  We continued to give him healthy choices, and now that he is 13, he has grown 5 inches since the beginning of the school year, and he has gained 15 pounds, and he is a bottomless pit when it comes to eating.  He is still slim, and we continue to have healthy food choices for all of our kids.

 

Our 18 year old was always the smallest in his class, until he hit 10th grade.  He suddenly had a growth spurt, and now he is over 6 ft. tall, and weighs an appropriate 150 pounds.  He is appropriately slim and trim.

 

My 8 year old is still the picky eater, but he is growing and gaining weight, so we're not worried about the picky appetite.  He loves his meat and veggies.  We make sure that he gets a snack after school, and in the evening before bed...he seems to like to eat small amounts at a time.

 

I think the key to getting a child to eat enough is to offer healthy snacks and meals, and letting the kids help prepare their own food, tasting the ingredients when appropriate.  I know it has helped with our kids' picky appetites.

 

By the way, my youngest child breast fed until age 2 1/2...along with solids.  My other two naturally weaned themselves, but my youngest liked to cuddle and nurse...by age 2, the breast feeding was reserved for evening before bed...he didn't like being weaned, and he started biting me for awhile.  I wouldn't change a thing.  He is a very sweet and loving 8 year old now...still loves to hug and sit close for a bedtime story.  I think the breast feeding is an individual issue, as long as the child is getting plenty of solid foods too.

 

The purpose of the growth chart is to keep track of a child's individual growth.  If a child is in the 25th percentile for height, he should also be near the 25th percentile for weight.  If the percentages differ greatly, then there may be a weight issue...either underweight or overweight.  This is where the doctor will give advice or do testing to rule out health issues that may be causing the descrepancy.  Being small doesn't hurt the child, as long as the weight is proportionate to the height.  Sometimes it helps to look into the parent's growth patterns...I was always the smallest child in my class, so it makes sense that my kids would be too.

 

Do what works for your child, and take the doctor's advice with a grain of salt...they are not with you on a daily basis...they are there to monitor progress, monitor health, and give advice that seems appropriate at the time.  Keep the foods healthy, and your child will grow up just fine.

Unfortunately, this isn't about genetics.  This is about malnutrition, which in my mind is tantamount to abuse.  I'm not talking about her case, but in some cases it is.

 

Breast feeding is fine, but if that's the only thing the 19 month old depends on for sustainance, that's NOT enough.  The poster's ht/wt did not match up.  LISTEN TO YOUR DOCTOR.  Offer more and frequent food, improve the quality of the food, and be sure the children do not go hungry.

 

If you feed them more, more protein, and more frequently and they're STILL underwt, look for a medical reason.  Do what works, but consider that the doctor may have a point here.  Communicate with your doctor, let him know what works and what does not, he may be able to diagnose and treat whatever conditions the child may have developed.

 
February 15, 2007, 12:46 pm CST

so true

Quote From: gwarrior6

Unfortunately, this isn't about genetics.  This is about malnutrition, which in my mind is tantamount to abuse.  I'm not talking about her case, but in some cases it is.

 

Breast feeding is fine, but if that's the only thing the 19 month old depends on for sustainance, that's NOT enough.  The poster's ht/wt did not match up.  LISTEN TO YOUR DOCTOR.  Offer more and frequent food, improve the quality of the food, and be sure the children do not go hungry.

 

If you feed them more, more protein, and more frequently and they're STILL underwt, look for a medical reason.  Do what works, but consider that the doctor may have a point here.  Communicate with your doctor, let him know what works and what does not, he may be able to diagnose and treat whatever conditions the child may have developed.

You're right on the mark...by the way, I love the kitty picture.
 
February 15, 2007, 12:48 pm CST

TRUE

Quote From: idealw8

This all boils down to one simple fact - humans don't emerge from the womb knowing what a cupcake or a chicken nugget is.  These stories profile child neglect if not outright child abuse.

 

I'd say more, but for some reason networks in one of the largest markets in the country have decided to show Phil one week late.  It's Valentine's day and I'm just seeing this episode today.

If you've never had it - you never crave it. 

 

I was appalled at what the parents were doing to their kids.  I can't for the life of me figure out how someone couldn't correlate over feeding your kids (with junk food, no less) any less abusive than beating them with a belt. 

 

I laughed out loud when Mom threw Dad under the bus for feeding the 7-yr old crap.  "Oh - but HE does all the grocery shopping."  Mmmm-hmmm.  Why not throw out whatever you think is bad for the kids?  Maybe because secretely it's all your favorite food too?  Both parents were full of it.  They weren't buying the crap because that's what the KID wanted.  But it was a nice attempt at a pathetic excuse...

 

l really laughed out loud when Grammy said that she only gave the kid a Twinkie for eating one or two carrots as a means of motivating him.  GET REAL!  You're lazy...it's easier to pacify a kid than it is to fight with him.  Like none of us have ever been there...DUH!  It would be soooo much easier to let my daughter go play outside with her friends than it would be to keep her in the house where I can hear her whining about having to clean her room.  It would be soooo much easier to let my son eat Taco Bell every night rather than watching him turn his nose up to the food I've cooked. 

 

I'm not perfect.  I mess up.  But come on...at least I'm honest about it!

 
First | Prev | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | Next | Last